50 anecdotes sur le cinéma pour briller en soirée

avr - 16 2014 | no comments | By

welcome to my blog .

On aime tous briller lors d’une soirée  cinéma  avec les amis, mais pour cela il faut avoir quelques infos surprenantes dans votre giberne ! DMB vous offre l’occasion d’épater ce monde avec 50 anecdotes...

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Success Is Mine

avr - 09 2014 | no comments | By

'Success is Mine' I'm on the rise, its time to get organized, its all in the state of mind; all they fight, I won't stop trying so watch let the star shine. Dale Fitzgerald, aka Protokol was born and raised in Kingston Jamaica. He grew up in the Seaview...

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American Entrepreneur

avr - 09 2014 | no comments | By

American Entrepreneur

American Entrepreneur follows the amazing life of Bill Joiner, a true self-made businessman in the best American tradition. From wild early days in Texas to a life of service to God and his church, Joiner blazes his own path through hunting, sports,...

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7 Odd Combo Gadgets Marketers Thought Come to Reality in 2010x

mar - 30 2014 | no comments | By

A multifunctional device is a typical thing nowadays. We are used to smartphones, which are cameras and web browsers and more, rather than just phones, as well as to laptops that are also tablets. But this list of combo-devices can surprise even the...

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Rebranding Start to Finish

mar - 30 2014 | no comments | By

We all remember Marlin (Nemo's dad played by Albert Brooks) following Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) around and trying to understand her philosophy of "Just Keep Swimming". While it might promote sanity, it's the worst thing you can do for your brand. By " Brand...

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The Dark Side of Marketing Analytics

mar - 17 2014 | no comments | By

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8 Steps to Get More Leads from Presentations

mar - 08 2014 | no comments | By

8 Steps to Get More Leads from Presentations GetMoreLeads 8 Steps to Get More Leads from Presentations GetMoreLeadsYou get up in front of the audience, make a presentation and then sit down. Applause. Clap. Clap, Clap. Is that where it ends? Regardless whether it's 5 people, 500 or 5000 clapping, remember this: The applause doesn't acquire the leads. Clapping doesn't close the deal. You have to do more to get more leads. But what? If you do presentations for your business, it's a great opportunity to gather some new leads from the audience. But it's an opportunity that is often overlooked and underutilized. Start using these techniques to maximize your ROI from your presentation efforts. The Starting Point For Getting More Leads Presentations should be looked at as a starting point for a new relationship and new leads with everyone in the audience. They are there because they are interested in what you have to say. They want to hear your thoughts and the presentation that you developed for that topic. They are an interested group of people. It's hard to get a better or more receptive group. It's an opportunity that is ripe for the picking…or yours to lose. To not realize that….to not cultivate that opportunity….to not capture that and capitalize on that is an omission that many people make. They are missing huge opportunities. Missing opportunities for business leads. More leads. So HOW do you maximize the return that you get from a presentation? Let's look at some of the things that you can do…starting with your very next presentation. There are even some that you can even tap into for a presentation that you have done recently. 1. Provide materials that describe what you will talk about. Ahead of time. When you are going to make a presentation, be sure that your audience know what the objectives of your talk is about. For those who are interested in that topic, they will be "primed" to listen. Provide some "teaser" points that hints at your content, without revealing the total message. There are many ways to do this, and some effective tools are providing leading questions…that you will answer. You should also include your contact information and web site to let people explore what you have to offer ahead of time. 2. Provide some of the answer(s)…but not all. A great presentation will create questions in the minds of your audience. You need to think and act like a fisherman. You set out the bait on the hook, then wait patiently. Just like the fisherman…if you put out too much food on the hook, you will lose the fish. Tease and get their interest. When they bite…set the hook. How? Provide SOME of the answers to the questions…but not all. Leave them wanting more. 3. Include leads to other resources that you can provide…including your web site or blog. Make sure that the URL or other information is readily available in and during your presentation and in sufficient large print for your audience to get it right. And give them sufficient time to write it down. Also include it in your summary description. Use a strong close that includes a summary of what you talked about. It' might include an invitation to get more information from your site on the topic. 4. Recap the talk in a single slide or in 30 seconds. At the end, remind the audience what they learned and how it will impact them. Be sure to let them know that you are available for more in depth and comprehensive solutions…in your consulting services. Include information on how to contact you for more information. 5. After the presentation, be sure you have printed materials to give out to those who are interested. Business cards and informative brochures are helpful to be sure that the audience has the correct contact information for you. Those materials MUST have all of your contact information. 6. Collect THEIR business card and information. If they don't have a card…give them 2 of yours, with a pen…and instruct them to put their name, phone and e-mail on the back of your card and give it back to you. Turn YOUR card into THEIR card. Leave the other card with them. Hand writing your e-mail or phone on the card provides extra emphasis. Simple and effective. 7. Follow up after the presentation. If you are a guest speaker, the sponsor often provides the speakers with an attendee list with address. Ask the sponsor if they can provide the phone numbers and e-mails of the attendees. Get ANYTHING you can about the audience. A follow up letter to the audience with a quick summary of the major points of your presentation and an invitation to follow up can be a great reminder to many of your audience members of just how great your content was and how it can benefit them. Be sure to include your value proposition in the letter…to ensure that they see the value of establishing a relationship with you 8. Look for other opportunities to engage them further. Invite them to your web site. Provide them with a "special bonus"…perhaps a PDF or an MP3 of the presentation…available for download at your site. It's a great way of further capturing information …including their e-mails. Invite them to future presentations. Provide them with information on your products or services. But ENGAGE them further. And invite them to provide that information to others that may also be interested. It's unlikely that anyone else will provide the audience with that information…and they will notice. They were there for a reason…and make sure you capitalize on it, but providing them with what they were looking for. These 8 simple, yet effective steps will help you structure great post-presentation follow up to help you get the maximal ROI from your presentation efforts. Do you like this post? Do you find these topics useful? Want to read more by SGRuby? Sign up a EntrepreneurialPractice.com to receive all posts by e-mail.
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Do You Want To Be A Good Video Marketer

mar - 06 2014 | no comments | By

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Nelson Mandela

fév - 24 2014 | no comments | By

biography of Mandela , mandella Nelson Mandela This is hardly the first serious biography of Mandela. There are already two ‘authorised’ biographies, both by friends of his, writers belonging to the same generation as their subject. Fatima Meer’s Higher than Hope was researched and written in the late 198os and published in 1988.1 Anthony Sampson’s Mandela was published in 1999.2 Martin Meredith’s equally perceptive and detailed treatment of Mandela’s life appeared in 1997.3 This book draws upon these writers’ work sub¬stantially, as well as using the same kinds of primary sources: corres¬pondence, Mandela’s own writings, interviews, and memoirs, court documents, and contemporary press reportage. My first acknow¬ledgements should therefore be to Fatima Meer, Anthony Sampson, and Martin Meredith. Their work will continue to represent essential foundations for any future assessments of Mandela’s career. How is my treatment of Mandela’s life different from theirs? It is different in several ways. First of all, my understanding of Mandela’s childhood and youth is, I think, more complicated than in the other narratives about his beginnings. Mandela’s childhood was unusual because of his early departure from his mother’s household and his subsequent upbringing as the ward of a royal regent. Mandela’s emo-tional self-control as a personality, as well as his receptiveness to new ideas, is, I think, attributable to his upbringing in highly institutional-ised settings. Both at court and at school, Mandela absorbed principles of etiquette and chivalry that remained important precepts through his public life. They were principles that were reinforced by a sophis¬ticated literary culture that fused heroic African oral traditions with Victorian concepts of honour, propriety, and virtue. From his boy¬hood, Mandela’s life was shaped by ideas or values that were shared by rather than dividing his compatriots, black and white. In this context, the absence in his early life of intimidating or humiliating encounters with white people is significant, and, to an extent, distinguishes his childhood from many other black South African childhoods. Understandably, Mandela’s role as a primary agent in enabling the achievement of South African political reconciliation is a key theme in later projections of his life. Mandela’s autobiography, published in 1994, emphasises his own experience of empathy and even kindness across South Africa’s historic social and political fault lines, experi¬ence that could reinforce a project of new nation building. The tact¬ful omissions in his own testimony when it is compared with other histories of his life should remind us that autobiography is not always good history and Mandela’s own words about his own life should be read as critically as any other source. Even so, my book does cite plenty of contemporary evidence to suggest that Mandela’s willing¬ness to embrace all his compatriots as citizens was sustained by profes¬sional protocols and codes of behaviour. Even in the increasingly polarised climate of South Africa in the 1950s, these ideas about social conduct could transcend racial identity and they reinforced the decorous manners and patrician conventions that Mandela had maintained from home and school. I find less of a contrast than other writers between the young Mandela and the older veteran of imprisonment. Generally in Mandela’s career there are no sudden turning points; rather key decisions develop out of lengthy incremental processes of thought, and are often influenced by Mandela’s recollection of precedent. One especially significant instance of the continuities in his political beliefs was his conviction that reasoned discussion would eventually broker what he himself would eventually describe as a ‘legal revolution’. Legal training and practice had a crucial impact upon Mandela’s political development. In general, historians of anti-colonial move¬ments have paid insufficient attention to the influence of colonial legal ideas on African nationalist leadership. Mandela’s life is an espe¬cially striking demonstration of the ways in which ideas about human rights and civic obligations were shaped by his professional training. Most importantly, the structured world of courtroom procedure itself shaped Mandela’s political practice, restraining it even in its most theatrically insurgent phases, and reinforcing his respect for institutions, traditions, and history. The language of theatre is used quite commonly among Mandela’s biographers, but in this book one of my particular preoccupations is with Mandela’s political actions as performance, self-consciously planned, scripted to meet public expectations, or calculated to shift popular sentiment. Birth, upbringing, emotional self-sufficiency from an early age, social grace, imposing appearance, and elite status com-bined to encourage in Mandela an unusual assurance about his des-tiny as a leader, a ‘sense of his power’ to shape his own life that seems to have been shared by those around him. For Mandela, politics has always been primarily about enacting stories, about making narra¬tives, primarily about morally exemplary conduct, and only secondar¬ily about ideological vision, more about means rather than ends. In the South Africa of the early apartheid era, Mandela was one of the first media politicians, ‘showboy’ as one of his contemporaries nick¬named him, embodying a glamour and a style that projected visually a brave new African world of modernity and freedom. Mandela’s ascent as a politician and as a member of black Johannesburg’s high society occurred at a time of more general upward mobility among black South Africans and early sections of this book explore in some detail the social setting in which Mandela became a public personality. Mandela was especially sensitive to the imperatives for acting out a messianic leadership role during his short service as a guerrilla com-mander, a phase in which he and his comrades deliberately set out to construct a mythological legitimacy for their political authority, and in which they could engender hopes among their compatriots that salvation would be achieved through their own heroic self-sacrifice. From this perspective, their strategic and tactical decisions become more explicable. It was an approach that was rewarded several decades later when both Mandela and the movement around him exploited his iconic and celebrity prestige to endorse political compromise that may otherwise have been popularly unacceptable. In this book, I maintain that Mandela’s prestige, his moral capital as it were, was the consequence of an exceptional public status that began to develop very early in Mandela’s career, well before his imprisonment. His moral standing as a leader was enormously enhanced by his imprisonment, of course, although the reasons for his ascendancy as an international public hero during his years on Robben Island are by no means straightforward. In my own treatment of Mandela’s life in prison I underline the extent to which the prisoners became an organised community—here I was helped by Fran Buntman’s superb monograph4 as well as a rich range of memoirs from Mandela’s fellow prisoners. Within this community, Mandela was accorded a particular status. He was accorded this status by the prisoners and also, as importantly, by the officials who governed the prison. This highly structured world of the prison may have been a crucial environmental setting in helping Mandela to preserve his commitment to orderly political process, a commitment that contrasted sharply with the more apocalyptic perceptions of many of his contemporaries during the 197os and 198os. Imprisoned leaders can be supplanted by fresh generations of poli-ticians at liberty, however, and what was remarkable about Mandela’s authority was its endurance over generations and, moreover, his incorporation into an international iconography assembled by young people at the beginning of the 199os. I do not find organisational explanations for Mandela’s continuing influence very persuasive, those explanations, for example that focus on the channels of com-munications between the Robben Islanders and their followers else-where. Instead, the sources of Mandela’s appeal were then, and to an extent remain today, charismatic and cultural, to do with his apparent immortality despite or even because of his removal and absence, a product of the stories enacted by him and told about him, and the particular power of these stories to reach a multiplicity of audiences inside and beyond South Africa. His especial accessibility to a trans-national English-speaking following was the consequence of his own personification of the secular liberal values instilled in his ‘English’ schooling. Also, perhaps more importantly, it was an effect of his marriage to a remarkably talented leader in her own right who helped keep his authority in currency. In prison, especially, popular projections of his life become intertwined with Winnie Madikizela’s story, and the couple’s very public exemplification of romantic love and sexual intimacy accentuated Mandela’s appeal outside South Africa. As his former wife’s contribution to Mandela’s authority demon-strates, Mandela’s domestic or private life cannot easily be separated or compartmentalised from his political or public career. For Man-dela, the commitments and obligations that arise from kinship and community often intersect with his politics, despite his occasional efforts to resist them and notwithstanding his own self-acknowledged shortcomings as a husband and a father. Indeed he may have experienced such commitments as all the more morally compelling and the more emotionally comforting because of the disrupted history of his domestic affairs. The social connections pro¬vided by kinship networks remained important to Mandela even after his arrival in Johannesburg. Initially, of course, they supplied him with important sources of support and solidarity. Throughout his political career Mandela maintained at least a qualified sense of obligation to his aristocratic kinsfolk, despite the disapproval that this aroused among his more Jacobean comrades. His attachment to the values associated with family and clan remain evident today in his quite genuine delight on encountering children, but these values shape his politics in a much more profound way. For in Mandela’s thinking there is a tension between two sets of ideas about democracy. In many of his most formal expositions about his civic beliefs—his prepared speeches and addresses—he uses the vocabulary associated with the conventional institutions of liberal government, the ‘ordin¬ary democracy’ as Mandela has called it that organises and regulates difference, and in doing so maintains adversaries as competitors. Such professions by Mandela of his belief in liberal institutions are quite sincere. But in the same discourses there appear references to a quite different consensual model of decision-making. Here Mandela finds his inspiration in idealised recollections of pre-colonial African prac¬tice in which rulers encourage unity through presiding over dis¬cursive or deliberative practices. In this model, agreement is facilitated through a set of principles linked to ideas about obligation, to family, to friends, and to clan and nation. Mandela’s extraordinary loyalty to a political movement is partly an expression of this patrimonial associ¬ation of concepts of family, community, citizenship, and democracy.This conflation of these concepts is sometimes, although not always, evident in his political thinking and practice. In a very general sense, preoccupations about social obligations, about manners, about how people should behave, and about what is proper constitute the key concerns in Nelson Mandela’s politics. His willingness to acknowledge goodness where he finds it is a capacity that is nurtured by caring ‘about the little things in life’, to quote the words of Graca Machel, his third wife. Over and over again in this book’s narrative, Mandela draws moral and political sustenance from encounters in which everyday courtesy, consideration, and even gen-erosity soften conflict. The lessons that Mandela learned as a child about the importance of defeating one’s opponents without humiliat-ing them were deeply engrained. They shaped a politics of grace and honour that, notwithstanding its conservatism, was probably the only politics that could have enabled South Africa’s relatively peaceful transition to democracy, a transition that more than a decade later appears to have resulted in a stable constitutional order. In this book I have been able to exploit a rich range of biographical and autobiographical writing about Mandela and his contemporaries. Aside from the intellectual debts that I owe to the authors of these works, I am also grateful for other more personal kinds of help that I have received during my research and writing. For help in locating archival materials I am very grateful to: Michele Pickover, Carol Archibald, and Kate Abbott of the Historical Papers Section, Cullen Library, University of the Witwatersrand; Marcelle Graham and Diana Madden of the Brenthurst Library, Johannesburg; Verne Harris of the Nelson Mandela Foundation; and Gerrit Wage¬ner, Zahira Adams, and Natalie Skomolo at the National Archives of South Africa, Pretoria. Robert Edgar drew my attention to Mandela’s first published article as well as a file of early correspondence between Mandela and the Bantu Welfare Trust. Luli Callinicos allowed me access to the transcript of her interview with Mandela, enabling me to obtain fresh insights about his legal practice and his friendship with Oliver Tambo; Barbara Harmel’s and Philip Bonner’s interviews with Umkhonto veterans conducted on behalf of the Albert Einstein Insti¬tute’s South African Civil Society Project also constituted a major. (suite…)
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6 Metrics to Follow on Your Blog

fév - 21 2014 | no comments | By

6 Metrics to Follow on Your Blog We covered the reasons why you need Google Analytics on your blog - to, basically, improve based on this measurable data. It's true that some of the most important things can't be measured (like for example, how your readers feel after reading your post, is there a smile on their faces), but the numbers behind the behavior of your visitor when landing on your blog can give you valuable insights and help you manage better. hibou 6 Metrics to Follow on Your Blog Closely monitor your blog's stats... Closely monitor your blog's stats… Now we can look at some of the basic information Google Analytics provides for you. By combining this data you are getting deeper understanding of your audience wants and needs, and what you can do to serve them better. Check Google's Get started with Analytics to set up your account. Visitors This is probably the one metric you are constantly checking - how many people are visiting your blog. It helps you see if your traffic is increasing over time, is there (hopefully) a repeating growth every week. You want to build a loyal following, but you also want to grow and expand your presence, and this means bringing new people to your blog too. To attract more first-time visitors and get the most exposure you should focus on your target keywords, improve your SEO, get active on social media, produce quality and promote your content. Traffic Sources Your traffic sources tell you where your readers come from. Knowing this helps you select the best platforms to reach out to your audience. Here's what the terms mean: Organic Search includes people who landed on your blog by clicking a link in search results after they've looked up certain keywords. You can modify your blog's keyword strategy and SEO based on these numbers. Sadly, in September last year Google started redirecting all traffic to encrypted (protected) searches using https which meant no more organic keyword data in Google Analytics for bloggers and website owners. For more details and better understanding of the background read this SearchEngineWatch post. Direct is the traffic from the people who directly typed your URL in the browser. Referral traffic comes from searchers who clicked links to your blog on other blogs and websites. Social traffic includes the visitors who came to your blog through social media. Landing Pages Landing is the page your readers first visited. Look at your top landing pages and see if you can optimize them to include calls-to-action and encourage visitors to interact further with your blog. Also you can build your content around these interests of your visitors. Another important metric here is the Bounce Rate that shows the percentage of your blog visitors who viewed just one of your pages (the landing page), and left afterwards. Read the tips how to keep readers on your site and reduce the bounce rate. bloggers apps1 6 Metrics to Follow on Your Blog Download the Google Analytics app to get access to your blog's data from your phone. Download the Google Analytics app to get access to your blog's data from your phone. Average Time On Site It's important to know how much time your visitors spend on your blog. In most cases you want readers to stay longer, engaging with the content and going from one page to another, except for websites which provide short and fast services, where readers come, get the information they need, and leave quickly (grammar services or online banking). Looking at this data you can also determine whether those who visit your pages actually read the content. If your post of around 700 words was viewed by 1000 people, but the average time they spent on the page is below 10 seconds, you can be certain most of them have not read what you've written. The reason can be your slow loading time, or maybe the starting paragraphs are poor and you need to tweak them to intrigue visitors into reading further. Content Here's where you determine what content works best for your audience. Check which pages get the most views, how long people stay on those pages, and what are the bounce rates. If your visitors don't bounce off but read and click through, then your most popular content is not only interesting, but also encourages them to explore other pages on your blog. Consider these numbers next time you need ideas for blog posts. Exit Pages and Exit Rates Exit Page is the last page searchers visit on your blog before they leave, and after viewing multiple pages, or just reading that one. The Exit Rate measures the percentage of visitors who exit your blog through a particular page. This metrics help us identify whether our visitors find the information they look for and if they are satisfied. If your landing page data matches closely with the exit pages, it may indicate that the people who land on your blog are not satisfied with the content provided, so they leave having no reason to return. When analyzing and combining the information gathered from your blog's Google Analytics make sure to put all numbers into their context to get accurate results, and don't forget that these metrics are not generic for all types of blogs and websites, but you must decide for yourself which ones are the most important to you based on the goals you want to achieve. Do you use Google Analytics? What metrics do you find valuable? Tell us in the comments.
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